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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
they look to the devil and the titis -- a very complex religion well structured. they looked among the titis and the sound issue, dtt called issue. i often refer to issue as the imminent hearing condition. the issue is on project boasts. issue exists to teach humanity. there's always more than one side to an issue. more than one face to the reality, two to shoot aware of appearances. issue is the embodiment of the lesson embedded in such things. i want to teach about their folly and being dogmatic about any issue in a very painful way. like a good teacher, symbolic for those who haven't learned, looking at both sides of the question. his places at the crossroads, where he get confused. which rose to take at a crossroads? sound issue this is not allowed in the house. his places always at the doorstep because it's just too temperamental. before you do anything come and before you were shaped any of the titis, make sure you set aside a morsel for the messenger of the titis. you can deliver the message straight into the streets, but you may deliver it in a way without lying that makes you misint
human beings. so they look for the devil and look among the deities, a very complex religion. very elaborate, very well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found be issue, the deity called issue. who's issue? i often refer to issue as the imminent -- [inaudible] of the human condition. why do i call him that? issue is an unpredictable spirit. issue exists to teach humanity, but there's always more than one side to an issue. more than one face to any reality. teaches you beware of appearances. the best laid plans of mice and men, etc., issue is the embodiment of the lesson gained by such things. and when you teach humanity about the folly in -- [inaudible] or being dogmatic about any issue, it tends to do it in a rather painful way, you know, hike a good teacher armed with a cane, symbolic cane for adults who haven't learned the wisdom of looking at both sides of a question. and his places are the crossroads where, of course, which is the place where human beings get confused. which road do you take at a crossroads? issue's so mischievous that in the overall pant
of question about what religion he is. this is what makes it so hard for me to watch this. i think today, i am is going to clean out the attic instead of watching the inauguration. host: and that is chris in bedford, virginia. live pictures of the national mall as it fills in. 800,000 people are estimated to be here for president obama's second inaugural. that shot you see now is to give the capital. the white in the front, a friend of the mid-screen, those are seats. i guess those are reserved, so you do not have to get down there too early. the people that you see there are standing. there is a lot of standing going on, a lot of standing areas. people arrive several hours early, get through security, and wait for the events, and then join the parade. in a "usa today" this morning is this map that shows where some of the main areas of the events are taking place. here is the capital. here is the white house. the parade route will go, and here is the reviewing stand right in front of the white house here. there's a the two main places. but the third place that will get a lot of attention, were
clinging to their guns and religion? >> yes, these are the people that he believes he can move and persuade to be in favor of gun control in states like west virginia and wyoming. it's not going to happen. i will be very surprised if this thing ever gets out of the senate. i think speaker john boehner love the idea of saying that we will give serious consideration to whatever harry reid senate passes and sends to us in a matter of gun control. it's a terrible issue for democrats. i don't think obama has the loyalty among democrats in gun control that he thinks he has. jon: hairy weed has the support of the nra in times past. >> yes, harry reid cannot cross the nra. there are voters in a lot of these places. the nra doesn't speak for them. this is a popular position among actual voters and you can see the red states with blue feathers. jon: good analysis as always. thank you so much. >> it's great to be here be to growing pressure on the senate to do something they haven't done in four years. we are talking about passing a federal budget. republicans in the house trying to force senators to
calling for his release saying we condemn iran's violation of universal right of freedom of religion we call on him to respect his rights and release him. >> another miracle on the hudson they managed to get out of the sinking plane. they were in the water for hours. >> we had a visual on them and we were trying to head them off. they were going southbound at a pretty good clip. >> they were taken to the hospital. they are being treated for hy hypotherm hypothermia. >> four years ago sulley sullen burger crashed a plane on the hudson river saving the lives of 150 people on board. >>> brand new de bails em americaing from the horrific fire that killed 233 people in brazil. they blocked the exits because they didn't want people to skip out on their bar tabs. about 2,000 people were inside at the time. that's double the club's maximum capacity of 1,000. many of the victims died from smoke inhalation others were trampled in the rush to escape. >> parts of the mississippi river back open to traffic this morning after two barges hit a bridge. both ships were heavily damaged one carrying 80,00
an emotional debate about religion, civil quites and the nature of -- rights and the nature of marriage. it now moves to the senate. rhode island is the only state in new england which does not allow same sex couples to marry. >>> all right, 4:38 good morning, happy friday. snow, snow, and maybe a little more snow. this afternoon, where it could be a few flakes on your drive home. howard is back in two minutes with more on what you can expect. >> mcdonald's makes a decision to make sure you're eating socially conscious food. >> the next time you send a letter in the mail, yeah it's going to cost you more. >> wusa9 is back in two minutes with your weather first. >>> welcome back. 4:40 on this friday morning. a nice quiet cold morning. we've got clouds now and during the afternoon some snow is going to develop and should be light but with temperatures in the 20s for the most part it will stick to anything that is untreated and we're not looking at a lot of snow but the timing could affect your drive home. i'll be back in just a couple of minutes and we'll talk about the weekend forecast and hey f
of the one that thomas more wore when he defy the king's unjust laws against religion. and from colombia, mr. o, you and miller should not rule out that we're the happiest people in the world here. most of us appreciate simple things like family and friends. been to colombia, a beautiful place especially cartagena. and we want to see the fresh show, are you coming to colorado? >> and we're going to the nokia, d.c., april 26th. long island june 1st and details on billoreilly.com. if you can't see us in person, bold and fresher
their religion, and shaped their individual personalities. so slavery was central to southern life. but slavery was also an institution, a form of property, that contained a problem. a problem for the masters. this valuable form of property was capable of thinking. capable of yearning for freedom. and capable of acting upon that yearning. this man, joshua speed, a kentucky slave owner, who is a friend of abraham lincoln's, put it this way. slave property is unlike any other. it is the only property in the world that has loco motion and a behind to croyle. and he went ton say that whys the owners of such property are so sensitive about any outside interference with it. their masters fear left them convinced their labors could be kept, controlled, and worked profitably only if they were kept uneducated, uninformed, isolated from dangerous influences, closely watched, intimidated, and convinced that their status as slaves was permanent and unchangeable. to accomplish that, so-communities and state legislatures made it a crime to teach slaves to read, severely limited slaves' movements off their ow
civic religion. radical still in much of the world but seemingly ordinary people can govern themselves. if we can't all agree on that and celebrate that, at least once every four years then there's something wrong with our culture >> brown: we have music. we have poetry. we got everything. >> everything, everything, wonderful >> and inclusiveness. that was the theme from beginning to end. people who often had been left out. were included. >> brown: all right. richard north and smith, annette gordon reed and beverly gauge, thank you all three >> thank you. >> ifill: and for the other news of this day, we turn to hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: there was word today that three americans died in the hostage stand-off in algeria that finally ended over the weekend. a u.s. official told the associated press that seven other americans escaped. it started wednesday when islamist militants linked to al- qaeda attacked a natural gas complex near the libyan border. algerian special forces then launched a series of operations to retake the site. today the prime minister gave his first official d
we have a kind of americanized version of prosperity gospel religion in america, and yet micah asked the question how do you worship? do you worship with fatted calves or rivers of oil? you do justice and you love mercy and walk before god not arrogantly. that's micah's answer to the question. jesus puts another one. he says preach the gospel, good news to the poor, heal the brokenhearted, set the captive free. so i thought he was very profound in his prayer today, but i thought president obama back to that again delved deeply into the declaration of independence today much like dr. king did talking about the american promise, the big tent where you are gay or straight or whether you are black or white, whether you are in appalachia or selma, all are in and nobody is out. i thought that was the major thrust of that address today. >> thank you so much for joining us on this special day. and i'm delighted to say that having steamed through various traffic and con investigation, i'm joined by jonathan capehart of the "washington post" and julian epstein, both of whom are special and pre
has never answered is why he now believes his religion allows for something he said his faith opposed and why now he believes marriage is is a civil right when in the past he flatly declared it was not? and by the way, did anybody in the mainstream media point that out? not a single person. the inauguration and events provided countless of examples of the media shirking responsibility and not doing their due diligence vetting obama. maybe it comes from the fatigue from the vetting the bush administration for eight years and how difference the coverage was for president bush and the inauguration and other events. the trip down memory lanes and look at the coverage of president bush, the inauguration in 2005. what a difference. >> on world news tonight sunday, president bush prepares for his second inauguration. in a time of war and natural disaster, is it time for a lavish celebration. >> do you think the balls and some of the excess are appropriate or is it forgivable. >> many have wondered whether given the war and all of our security challenges right now, it's appropriate to have a
, it was a replica of the one that thomas more wore when he defy the king's unjust laws against religion. and from colombia, mr. o, you and miller should not rule out that we're the happiest people in the world here. most of us appreciate simple things like family and friends. been to colombia, a beautiful place especially cartagena. and we want to see the fresh show, are you coming to colorado? >> and we're going to the nokia, d.c., april 26th. long island june 1st and details on billoreilly.com. if you can't see us in person, bold and fresher dvd's. monica, short, north carolina, my grandson alex, a fifth grader did a report on killing lincoln. i read it monica, excellent work for the tyke. and killing lincoln top five. and from italy, mr. o, please come here and rescue us from american liberals like george clooney. hopefully the italian government will make him pay his fair share on his majestic villa. i want to go trick-or-treating at his place and i may come over to lake cuomo around halloween. a great place, i love that whole area up there. and finally factor tip of the day. last night i rec
protects the people's rights of freedom of speech, freedom of press, free exercise of religion, free trade agreement of association and all other such rights of the people. my second amendment advances the fundamental principle of political equality for all by empowering congress and the states the right to regulate political spending. it will allow congress to pass campaign finance reform legislation that will withstand constitutional challenges. mr. speaker, we need to empower people, not corporations or big money special interests. our current system has been corrupted. it undermines the rights of ordinary citizens. it undermines our democracy. surely this is not the system our founders envisioned. the preamble to the constitution is we the people. let us hope that this congress doesn't forget that. i ask my colleagues to join me in supporting these important bills to reform our campaign finance laws and assure that corporate rights do not trumps people's rights. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. t
. i am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. this hindu-muslim-christian- jewish-buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of saint john: "let us love one another (yes), for love is god. (yes) and every one that loveth is born of god and knoweth god. he that loveth not knoweth not god, for god is love. if we love one another, god dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us." let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. we can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. the oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. as arnold toynbee says: "love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. therefore the first hope in our
is somewhat distressing, we are moving in our country to maybe a state religion which says anybody who believes homosexuality is biblically untrue is some kind of a pariah, and so we're forcing a religious belief on the catholics and on the muslims and all these religious groups who happen to believe that homosexuality's inappropriate. whatever each of you believe, you should be able to believe what you want to believe. but i don't think the government should force or a religion onto a nation of people where we've so held, clinged to our idea of religious freedom. someone has told me, and this is a high-level person who all of you know, he heads up one of the think tanks, that george soros has funded an organization which is now going into churches to tape sermons for the fact that going forward -- i believe it's section 501 and not necessarily 501(c)(3), but the bob jones university lost its tax exemption because they had a policy against interracial marriage. and that was against public policy. so what this section in the irs says, 501, if you are against public policy, your tax exem
going on where people who had taken on certain religions were not voting. i saw the felonies that people wanted to change in the community. as far as supporting him in those areas of his new agenda, you have to understand that he had four years to clean up america and he has done a wonderful job. he pulled together a campaign and put diversity all over. we have to stop looking at presidential issues and look at what is at hand. we need to stop hiding behind a wall and congress should helpless do that, not fair to the people, the children that were killed. who is going to work? who is going to take on the new america if there are no people to take it on? thank you for allowing me to have my opinion. i truly feel that american citizens that lived and died for us, thank you to them for allowing us to have this conversation. >> the eugene robinson -- host: the eugene robinson piece this morning, "no longer the black president." "the verdict of his presidency will depend on what he accomplishes in his second term." host: that is the piece from eugene robinson, "no longer the black president."
about their religion and their gods? we have they warfare going on around this country. we are talking about gun control. if i want to see somebody taken now, why do have to go inside a school? guest: i want to thank the caller for his service in vietnam. this is one of the big shifts in its war effort than i write about in my book. the major philosophy for insurgents was socialism, communism, often allied with nationalism. that change in 1979 we saw the rise of jihadism as the dominant force driving terrorism around the world. he saw that with the takeover of the embassy in iran. he saw that with the soviet invasion of afghanistan. you saw all those things coming together in a way that empowered jihadists. tendency to saya tennesse that they are fanatical. the history suggests otherwise. and proper strategy that we implemented in iraq which focused on security and tries to provide some of the legitimate needs of the people who want economic growth and jobs and freedom. a strategy like that can be successful. we saw that in the surge in iraq. do not lose heart. the reality is most insu
constrained because of religion to talk to my male counterparts, and were more open to talking to me because i was a women. when one of the. goals is to win the hearts and minds, being able to communicate with the local population is critical and i have seen reports of engagement with local children and women in a way that must be much more difficult for men to do, and of course as medics serving fellow soldiers. host: the last caller run-up israeli women who served in combat in the israeli army. we want to show our viewers a list of countries allowing women in close combat roles including -- for the sake of this discussion, defying what is combat -- define what is combat. guest: the regulation was written in 1994, and according to that women were to be banned from ground combat, which was defined as engaging the enemy on the ground while being exposed to hostile fire and a high probability of direct physical conflict. it would take place on the battlefield. interestingly enough, as engagid regulation that was just rescinded -- the army regulation was different and banned women from code locat
where they can look at the blessing. >> i think that what's helping this family is their religion, their community. they're embedded in a community, and many people in this country are not. you know, there's been a tremendous loss of community and connections with people. so, you know, i would just say, you know, build up your community and your connections, because this kind of thing can happen to any one of us at any moment. >> salgo: i want to go back very quickly to this whole concept of complicated grief, or whatever you'd like to call it. there's this -- there's a list. extreme depression, focus on the loss, intense longing -- that just goes on, and you get stuck, i thinkwas the phrase that you used. if someone has these symptoms, what do you do about it? is there medical intervention that works? >> well, i think, first of all, all those symptoms are probably normal for a while. and what i really look at is, are they interfering with the person's functioning. otherwise, a lot of those things are normal and can continue for a long time. >> but i think when they're interfering
at them. it's our secular religion. that's what this day is. think of what an extraordinary moment it is. a person is a private citizen. they take that oath. they become the most powerful person in the world. they're finished. they go out. they go back out. and they're a private person again. almost no other country in the world is that possible. it's an extraordinary moment. >> i've been disappointed. a lot of people have been disappointed. if you read "the new york times" this weekend, how the president managed the office on a personal basis with members on the hill on both sides. are you hopeful that this president has learned from some of the mistakes of the first term and he's going to reach out more aggressively? even to his own party on the hill. >> well, i think he's a reflective person. he does think he's talked more than most leaders about what he did wrong the first term. that's not usual that these characters admit it and he has. i'm not sure how far he'll get reaching out to republicans. he's tried more than we know. they just didn't come sometimes. the democr
. king says, regardless of nationality, race or religion to admit our wrongs and turn from them. i believe that the denial of the right to life is the greatest injustice we face in the world today. there is no compassion in killing, she sails. there is no justice in writing people out of the human race. history, mr. speaker, will not look favorably on today's abortion culture. we must indeed and instead work tirelessly to replace it with a culture of life. i would like to now yield to my good friend and colleague, macha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. -- marsha blackburn, for such time as she may consume. mrs. blackburn: thank you, mr. speaker, and i thank the gentleman from new jersey for the excellent work that he continues to do year in and year out on this issue. i appreciate his leadership and we do stand today and mark the 40th anniversary of the tragic roe v. wade decision and it really is said that not all life is created equal. and since the supreme court gave our government's approval if you will of on-demand abortion, there have been over 55 million lives lo
of an old and honored religion. and what we need to do is find a way -- and this is something we have to work at -- for people to understand the degree to what that is happening and how it has become an excuse for their disenfranchisement, for being deprived of good governance, for being deprived of a good economy, jobs and opportunity. one of our missions is to not let that be an excuse. so i think carrying the banner of religious tolerance and diversity and pluralism is critical. i know we have raised that with president morsi. i've personally raised that with him. i think i was the first american to meet with him before he became -- before he even knew he was a candidate. and we talked about the need for the brother had to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. that has not happened completely as much as we would like in the constitutional process. but, as i said, that is an ongoing process and we need to work together in order to try to do it. but, senator, you've raised a central issue with respect to what is happening to politics of certain regions of the world. and it has t
been contingent on progress from freedom of expression, freedom of religion. due process under the law. secretary clinton waived that so this could go to this new regime. this technology should not be going to this regime now. at the same time we need to find a way to ensure egypt doesn't give away the peace they have had with israel for a long time. that may be going any way because of the muslim brotherhood. dollars is how we have leverage. >>gretchen: do you think there's anything in the fine print that says you can only use these f-16's for specific purposes or not? >> how do we control it once they're in their hands? plus the relationship our military has had with their military for so long has eroded a little bit since the muslim brotherhood took over. once you hand these weapons over, i don't know that you have much control on how they're used. all the technology is not in them. they are not u.s. specs. their capabilities are below what ours are. still they can outfit them the way they want, use them as they fit. in the hands of the muslim brotherhood, this is not good. we have
, and then it talks about egyptian. it doesn't talk about their sex or religion or sex. it continues talking about egyptians as persons. so that's the whole thing. >> when you wanted to say something? >> [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i believe that the west must be aware of something. now, after the revolution the west wanted to deal with arab regimes that were similar to his own regime, similar to his own situation. they thought that the situation would be similar to what they had in the west. however, the people in the arab world don't want that. they want respect for their own specificities, they have their own conditions and their own contexts. what do we want as arab people? we don't want women to ware the veil -- wear the veil to remove the veil, we don't want to force them to wear the veil. we don't want to force anybody to do anything. now, of course, we are witnessing this movement and this transformation in our society, and we have some people who might force their wives or their daughters to wear the veil or to remove the veil. however, this is not the opinion of the mainst
. louis, missouri, baseball isn't a sport, it's a religion. and if that's true, stan musial was a st. louis civic patriot saint. stan musial was an icon in st. louis. he was the best ball player ever to wear a cardinals uniform and one of the best to ever play that great game. stan musial was my childhood hero when i was a boy, and he remains a hero in my life to this day. you know when you've reached my age and maybe my station in life, you're supposed to be beyond the stage of swooning but when it comes to stan musial, i'm a kid all over again, buying more bubble gum than i can possibly afford in the hope that i would open up one of those packages and find covered with pink powder that card that had stan musial's picture on it. it was the treasure of my youth, and it would be so today if my mom hadn't thrown all those cards away. well, stan musial's death sunday at the age of 92 has hit the cardinals nationwide like a death in the family. one cardinals fan spoke for many of us when she told a st. louis newspaper that losing stan musial is like losing your grandparent. it's hard not
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)